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20121201
20121201
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)
will lose its lease. it comes after a long battle whether the area should be restored to wilderness. there was a very high-profile visit recently from sal azar to the bay area. how did that work its way to the top of the food chain, if you will? >> it seems odd, it's just one oyster farm. it had been operating there with special permission, so a 40-year lease that actually expired today. and what happened was the owner, kevin lundy, bought it in 2004, and he was hoping to get the parks service to extend his lease. it really became a battle. you had feinstein saying there are already these kinds of farms. and the area was slated to be destroyed already. >> how much environmental damage can an oyster farm do, and what did the science say about the damage that they were doing? >> that's what's interesting here. the science was the most political part of this. so the national parks service did an impact study. they said, well, we think that they do damage to the local habitat and they are disturbing harbor seals in the area, and that became very political. you have people saying they di
, including ropes course facilitator training. wilderness first responder training. kayak training. environmental training. they did a backcountry expedition. we were a partner and hosted and arranged for swim and water rescue curriculum. i want to thank jim wheeler for working with the foundation of youth investment. we made a sitting contribution in terms of pool and staff to this program which also gave the kids water safety and lifeguard training. what is so fabulous. i got to here each of the eight individuals speak during the graduation ceremony, all eight grow up in neighborhoods where there was no exposure to the outdoors. all eight spoke with great passion of how important this program was and how they want to devote their lives, their careers -- professional careers to helping welcome both their peer and younger adults to the outdoors and give them the same exposure and training. it was touch a touching event and such a poignant reminder of work we do. we were truly honored to have been a partner in the endeavor. now, without further adieu, jamie. this month in parks. ♪
chicken, some neck. >> rose: when, back to '93, '40, when he had been in the wilderness, 29, and had seen the coming of hitler and argued passionately within the counsel of government. how was that received at that time? >> well, in the middle of the 30s he was regarded as a real nuisance because he was talking about hitler but he was also making a fuss about other issues about india, all the an by-- abdication in which he was felt to be way out on opinions. and the feeling is winston is making a fuss because he wants to get back into office. by 38y, 39y, particularly after munich there is a strong sense, actually, although winston is a nuisance he's right on the fundamental thing. and he is the great advantage for churchill is that when war comes, he is in a position of not having been tainted. he's not got dirty hands. he has a really clear record. can speak with authority. and there is an overwhelming desire to see him back in government. >> and he manages an extraordinary passage for the british parliament because there was this growing unease, particularly after munich, so many peopl
be applied to a disaster. >> i'm lynn wilder, i'm the emergency management coordinate roar at san francisco general trauma center and i'm also representing the san francisco council of emergency partnership which is the group of emergency management coordinators from each of the hospitals throughout san francisco who mead regularly with dph and dem to plan and prepare for our medical response. >> as rob mentioned earlier, one of the primary reasons for the medical exchange is to get an understanding of the capabilities, what can the military bring and what are some of the challenges that we as civilians are going to face when we have this large number of casualties. so what i'd like to hear from our civilian panelists is what were some of our observations about the capabilities the military demonstrated down at moffatt >> i think one of the challenges the city faces in a big medical surge event is if patients have to be evacuated and the bridges were out and how would we do that? yesterday we saw a wide range of patient movement vehicles, basically, and it was great to see all those resour
and demonstrated those capabilities. miss wilder, earlier on you said game changing was a way to describe that. how do you feel being more aware of those assets and what they can do will affect your planning? >> it really has changed. i can tell you on the bus coming back from the actual exercise event and the exchange event, there were so many discussions about what we can do differently and how we can change our plans so that there are more options, different ways we can look at which hospitals are still standing and what capabilities they have and then how to augment those and supplement with strategic use of state and dod resources. and really looking at how can we make the best possible care system stand and deliver after a catastrophic earthquake. and that was extraordinary. it was really, you know, it changed the perspective. if you understand most hospitals deal with short term emergencies, we have things that happen that are usually 4 to 12 hours in length for the most part except for h1n1, which was so prolonged that it actually was a very different type of response for us. but a
should return to play. >> thank you, tom for wilderness foreign and obviously to bob who is that the science and discussion forward dramatically because one of the things we all know is we can't not do nothing or anything. see how many negatives are put in there to make a positive. we have to do something. as a clinician that these kids and families and our clinics in seeing the major education deficit on the fields today in all sports frankly, but also seeing the outcomes. some of the things that raise talking about in terms of understanding forces is really important and we just completed some work in developing measures they are using so we can understand their cognitive symptom kinds of effects of these to kids. i think that's very, very important outcome to what we need to link up with the games. from the perspective -- actually was at the aspen institute this summer, where u.s. nabobs question about, should we be eliminating football -- tackling a football before the age of 14. at that point i couldn't speak, although we did speak that night. one of the things i sai
Search Results 0 to 6 of about 7 (some duplicates have been removed)